Tagged: Hardcore Will Never Die But You Will

Mogwai Mogwai Mogwai…

…seems to be all that we’re about here at Elba recently! However, we feel it’s fully justified, after all, Kim is still giddy from their show at Paisley Town Hall and has had plenty good stuff to say about their new album. I myself will admit to being more unfamiliar with them than I should be but I’ve resolved with Kim that this will change!

Anyway, we were sent this rather lovely video of them playing Rano Pano recently, for BBC Scotland’s Vic Galloway Show.

Enjoy! I’m off to do my homework!!

Mogwai – Paisley Town Hall 27/01/2011

One of the most eagerly anticipated albums of this year has journalists singing praises higher than the choirs of whatever religion you want to throw in here for metaphoric effect. Mogwai live is the worship of noise. Paisley Town Hall was the setting for what turned out to be an evening that brought an abundance of new material to the ears of eager fans for the first time.


The first aural assault of the evening was White Noise – the same opening that you will hear when Hardcore Will Never Die, But You Will (HWND,BYW) is released on 14th February. It felt grand and worthy of its place in the set and it is a promising beginning for the seventh studio album from Mogwai. It was also the first of three album openers included in the well balanced set. Not enough good things can be said about Ithica 27/9 live. The buzzing ending is glorious and hearing wrecking when it hits you.

Mexican Grand Prix was the first of a tracks from HWND,BYW that are showing a slightly different side to Mogwai. It features a slightly more driven dance beat and a surprising inclusion of distorted vocals, leaving the usually sway reserved audience unsure whether they should dance or not. Certain attendees attempted to embraced buy cialis online no prescription this fully, though visibly to the horror of others.

I’m Jim Morrison, I’m Dead which is one of their greatest album openers, and as one of my own very favourite tracks, tore through victorious; an absolute highlight of the set. It proved to be one of the greatest moments of the night but, sadly, highlighted something that was missing from the other music premiering.

Hunted By A Freak worked its magic before one of the big moments of the evening when first single from HWND,BYW Rano Pano debuted. Live, Rano Pano is loud. Very loud. The floor bounced along with the bass and I could feel my being quiver. The song made devotees return to their regular stance, loose head-bang showing appreciation of the deliberately paced track. San Pedro is another new track that I really love on record but whilst still retaining it’s almost indie-dance charm live did not progress much and felt a little out of place in the set. Especially as a follow on from Yes! I Am A Long Way From Home.

Closing the performance was a blinding encore featuring new, beautifully named track, George Square Thatcher Death Party, You Don’t Know Jesus and a soul blackening rendition of Batcat.

Paisley Town Hall was a peculiar setting for the gig. It is a cavernous venue which coped well with the sound, considering the culprits. I was pleased to have had space to breathe for the duration but part of me was disappointed that I hadn’t made it to a hall that would have proved more appropriate. That along with the frustration that the band did not appear completely comfortable playing the new material, left me a little disappointed. This was openly noted onstage when support Remember, Remember were thanked for their patience as they forgot their parts during sound check, delaying the venue door opening and leaving fans outside with a down and out busker who had in his possession a banjo with an in-built technicolor light show. I digress… though that really was a sight and sound. The comparative deft and skill on established material made this show a bittersweet one. However, having acquired a ticket to see Mowai in The Barrowlands on 22nd December once the new material – that proved to be of exceptional quality – will have become part of their perfectly executed repertoire is a fine consolation.