Tagged: Glasgow Film Festival

Glasgow Music and Film Festival 2014

Glasgow Music and Film Festival returns for its sixth year snug inside the arms of the Glasgow Film Festival with events from 20 February to 2 March. The 2014 programme is laden with inimitable film, footage and performance. My excitement for this yearly calendar event has reached a peak with the quality of the 2014 schedule, a section of which I have highlighted after this rather swell photo of my Grrrl Kathleen.

Kathleen Hanna

This year, the Glasgow Music and Film Festival have a trinity of stimulating live scoring events. Heading this are Admiral Fallow with a Glasgow Film Festival commission to celebrate its tenth anniversary. The full event will feature both new material written to accompany bespoke visual content entitled Ten Takes, as well as familiar sounds played to the backdrop of William S Manson’s 1951 collection of footage Glasgow, No Mean City. The shots of bygone Glasgow against Admiral Fallow’s luscious, layered folk-pop suggest a wistful evening.

Dutch minimalist composer and lute lover (who isn’t?) Josef van Wissem will provide a live score to Partir To Live. The artist was presented the Soundtrack Award at the 2013 Cannes International Film Festival for his work on Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive. Partir To Live is the directorial debut of Domingo Garcia-Huidobro who describes the work as ‘an experience into sensations, ethical confusion, and physical and psychic contusions’. If you wish to be even more intrigued by the Chilean experimental film then you can watch the trailer here.

Once again the Music and Film Festival will return to Pollokshaws Burgh Hall to utilise the venue’s Wurlitzer pipe organ. Speedy is the silent film selection for this year led by the physical and gentle comedy of Harold Lloyd. Set in New York, Speedy is delightful caper with glorious shots of twenties Manhattan.

Another great strength of the festival has always been the gigs programmed in connection with films and this year is no different. For Requiem For Detroit at The Arches, Pressure present a DJ set by Carl Craig. The techno icon is a fitting selection as the documentary gazes into the slump of the city alongside the positive creative culture that has blossomed. Craig has been a techno and house ambassador to his home whilst supporting the engagement of electronic music within it his entire career.

Mistaken For Strangers is an unofficial tour documentary of The National shot by frontman Matt Berninger’s younger brother, Tom. Hired as a roadie for the tour, Tom proves a hindrance in the way that only a sibling can manage whilst also assisting to reveal a little seen side of the band’s identity. Lost Map’s Rozi Plain who supported The National on their last European tour will perform after the screening. I don’t know whether the film or gig calls to me more!

Finally, I would like to mention one of the more straight-ahead viewings of the festival, which is the Scottish premier of Kathleen Hanna documentary, The Punk Singer. If the next paragraph turns into a massive flap of the fangirl variety, it cannot be helped. Hanna, who returned to music last year with new outfit The Julie Ruin is the indisputable queen of Riot Grrrl. In Sini Anderson’s film, Hanna addresses her career from pioneering punk act Bikini Kill through to her days in Le Tigre (oh the dancing I’ve had to Friendship Station in my excitement over this film’s premier). Supported by interviews with Adam Horovitz, Tavi Gevinson, Kim Gordon, Carrie Brownstein, Corin Tucker, Joan Jett, Johanna Fateman, JD Samdon and Kathi Wilcox this looks to be a definitive record of the feminist figure. The evening will be introduced by Chvrches singer and synth-est Lauren Mayberry, co-founder of layered collective TYCI; for women, by women.

The full list of events is as follows:

– Metalhead, GFT, Fri 21 February, 3.30pm
– Partir To Live, CCA, Fri 21 February, 8.30pm
– Speedy, Pollokshaws Burgh Hall, Sat 22 February, 3pm
– Mistaken For Strangers, Paisley Arts Centre, Sat 22 February, 7pm / Glad Cafe, Tue 25 February, 7.30pm
– The Heart of Bruno Wizard, Sun 23 February, 9pm
– 20 Feet From Stardom, GFT, Tue 25 February, 6pm
– Danny Brown with Rollo Jackson, The Arches, Wed 26 February, 8pm
– Goblin, Oran Mor, Thurs 27 February, 8pm
– Requiem for Detroit, The Arches, Fri 28 February, 7.30pm
– The Punk Singer, GFT, Fri 28 February, 9pm
– Admiral Fallow – We Are Ten, Old Fruitmarket, Sat 1 March, 7pm
– Living Is Easy With Eyes Closed, Cineworld, Sat 1 March, 8.30pm

Further details on all of the above can be found on the Glasgow Music and Film Festival website. Tickets go on sale this Friday (24 January)

I like my music indoors

Recently, I have been considering the disparate activities of my flat-mate’s compared to my own. Were I to call upon my favourite bard of the central belt Aidan Moffat to set the scene; his life is the hedonistic romp of The First Big Weekend and he, no doubt, sees my own as the cyclical and serene Cages. My own interpretation of the latter is phrased a little kinder than the current misnomer I’ve been gifted: ‘old lady.’

Such teasing can be entirely attributed to the fact that I consume alcohol in much more reasonable measures than I did whilst at university. Therefore, I reject the implication that I am anything other than the excitable and immature creature that I have always been. That being said, I do have a new appreciation for certain comforts. For instance, the city based festival is something that I’ve always appreciated but now find myself increasingly excited about.

I guess the beauty of the city festival includes accessibility, advanced knowledge of the venue, a good meal being at hand and a warm bed not too far away.  You will not find yourself lacking in lubrication if we compare habits of a ‘major’ outdoor festival should my introduction be instilling this concern. My Triptych days eventually became a sleepless and overworked haze but originally

as an attendee those three to five days the festival spanned were a dreamy, inebriated rapture. The talent, the sounds, the many, many drinks. The festival and the sum of its parts will of course dictate this sort of behaviour. For instance, the Glasgow Film Festival won’t lead to any liver damage, (un)suprisingly(?) Celtic Connections might.

My attention has been drawn once again this year to the Stag and Dagger festival.  It boasts over 50 bands and DJs, seven venues and one ticket. The first acts that have been announced have the Elba ‘we’ salivating; with White Denim, Phantom Band, Django Django, Willy Mason and Bear in Heaven all due on May 19th.

The ticket is a very reasonable £17.50 or was £12.00 if you snatched an early bird price. The previous years’ line up promise another impressive selection of acts. I guess the greatest dilemma you will be faced with is what head line act you choose.  Ultimately you may have to sacrifice some mid evening

bands to guarantee a spot for whichever finisher you have your eye on though it is a small complaint that exists at all festivals; indoor or out.  Perhaps there isn’t so much different about the two, as Aidan says:

A new life is just a new routine,
a new function for the old machine

Festive Retrospective

The 2011 Glasgow Film Festival came to a close at the beginning of last week. Once again the programme on offer was so packed that it was impossible

to fit in absolutely everything you may have wished to view. My sacrifices this year included the entire Superheroes in Glasgow strand; a catastrophic omission as I’m an admirer of the comic-book form. Also Howl and the Jonny Greenwood scored, Murakami adaptation Norwegian Wood clashed with other events I was attending. The good news on the latter two is that they both open on the 11th March at the GFT, so all is not lost. As for my festival intentions, I wanted to focus on the Music and Film programme.

65daysofstatic’s live scoring of Silent Running was an eardrum thumping opening to my festival experience. The mood was set as the 65s fans settled with a playlist of contemporary film-music favourites including Clint Mansell, Trent Reznor, Jonny Greenwood and Yann Tiersen, to name quite an impressive few. This was a gentle and nurturing experience in comparison to the noise that followed. The delicate string scoring of the original opening credits with a backdrop of plant and pond visuals was replaced with ominous pounding and thrashing. Previously, 70’s sci-fi picture Silent Running was a slow paced presentation of a man unravelling whilst doing what he must to protect and preserve the last of Earth’s natural life. The inclusion of this new scoring brought a psychological harbinger. The fate of Freeman and his crewmen was laid bare from the off. The film chosen was a wise one as the long shots of space and regular montage provided ample time for 65daysofstatic to storm in with their insistent sounds. There was little in way of flow for the first section of the film. A little more care was taken in the latter half to not have such a juxtaposition between the audio dialogue track and their input, though the later parts of the film don’t feature much speech making such transition important. This was executed masterfully and I think contained to release in the climactic finale. It was a gloriously loud ending, the clash of noise ensuring the impact of all that had happened on screen over the 89 minutes was felt.

The other two events I attended were a combination of engrossing and peculiar. Upside Down: The Creation Records Story, was a bit of a Scottish music scene love-in when you glanced around the audience. The tales of Alan McGee’s early 80s indie insanity whilst commuting between Glasgow, London and Manchester proved to be tickling for the knowledgeable audience. The documentary is a large part The Alan McGee show, whose tales could impress anyone over a round at a local. I feel that this is an important point as whilst the tales of indulgence are entertaining there is a definite arrogance to the lack of consideration over consequences of action. Rock and roll is meant to be just this though, right? Almost all of the Creation crowd are featured giving their perspective on the rise and inevitable fall of the label, none surprised, though some affected more than others, by the collapse of it’s ringleader and their creative outlet. The first half of the film will please musos everywhere whereas the Oasis years will prove more appealing to others. Noel Gallagher’s commentary, regardless of any established opinion on his musical talents, do not disappoint.

The last event I attended was the Mondo Morricone gig at the Arches. I am a little stumped over what to say about this show. There were extraordinary moments beginning with Death Rides A Horse continuing on through huge tracks Man With A Harmonica/Once Upon A Time In The West and The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. It was all a little ramshackle, which was quite perfect for the selected renditions as all are fairly loose in their original recordings. This was emphasised more in the lounge style moments of Morricone repertoire selected; Hurry to Me being the most famous of these where there was discord on stage but it remained charming. Duglas T. Stewart was as eccentric as ever in his hosting with a Kermit badge on lapel, apple consumed during opening My Name Is Nobody, and – at one point in the set – brandished a kazoo proudly. I was confused when I left but light in step.

Time for a wee catch up I think…

Well, March is here already and it seems a bit like the year has flown by. It was maybe just me but I felt that the year started fairly quietly and that there was a distinct lack of good albums coming out but that seems to have perked up recently with releases from PJ Harvey, Smith Westerns and Ringo Deathstarr, the latter is an album that i am hugely enjoying at the moment. We are also looking forward here at Elba to upcoming releases from Aidan Moffat, Josh T. Pearson, FOUND and Le Reno Amps, once again, the latter is an absolute belter, which can be pre-ordered here. It’s shaping up to be a decent year!

The Glasgow Film Festival has finished for another year. Kim enjoyed a wall of noise at 65 Days of Static, Chris met legendary Spinal Tap bassist and voice of Mr Burns from The Simpsons, Harry Shearer whilst I now count Duglas T Stewart of the BMX Bandits in the highest regard after he nonchalantly tucked in to an apple onstage, midway through the opening song of the Mondo Morricone gig. There will be a bit more about those shenanigans on these pages in the coming days and weeks. We are already looking forward to 2012!

Next year is a long way away though so in the more immediate future here’s a few things you might want to check out. This weekend Trapped Mice launch their new EP which was recorded

in our big cousin Elba Studio’s recording space in January this year. Having heard some of the results, it’s a lovely wee EP and worth checking out. Anyhoo, the launch is in Edinburgh tomorrow (5th March) at the Wee Red Bar and support comes from Elba faves Loch Awe. Oh, and the EP is called Waving and Pointing!

Also, looking quite good this weekend in Glasgow is Croc v Croc at The Art School. There’s a huge list of people playing including Remember Remember, Ultimate Thrush, Divorce, Pro Life, North American War, BONG MONSTER, Holy Mountain, The Cosmic Dead, The John Knox Sex Club, Gropetown and Tangles. Check out their Facebook info page for a little more info!

Next weekend sees the return of Brain Burner to The Liquid Ship a mere two weeks after their last show. In short if you like things noisy and a little bit out there, Brain Burner do exactly what they say on the tin. The line up on Sunday 13th at The Liquid Ship includes Helhesten & Fritz Welch, Blue Sabbath, Buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo and Hivver.

On the subject of DIY gigs, we came across this tumblr called Tartanalia Underground this week which is pretty cool. It’s a nice wee collection of DIY posters, some really cool ones in there so far and I noticed theres an upload button so get adding!

Anyway, enough rambling for now! Have a great weekend, see y’all soon!

GFF 2011

Amidst all that was happening last week I managed to swiftly swoop by the Glasgow Film Festival launch.  I’ve been trying to find time to write about the multitude of programmed talkies that will be showing since Wednesday’s event but between gigs and Elba’s premiere DJ appearance at the most excellent and packed Barmellodie gig it has been rather tricky.  On the other hand, I am glad to have had time to digest the full brochure which is full and varied featuring plentiful picks for both cinephiles and music lovers alike. The two are intrinsically linked after all.


Glasgow Film Festival (GFF) 2011 returns for its seventh year with film and events spread throughout fifteen venues across the city from 17-27 February.  The festival is broken down into a number of strands which this year include amongst them the Glasgow Music and Film Festival, Glasgow Short Film Festival, Frightfest, Fashion in Film, Superheroes in Glasgow, European Cinema, Great Scots and Stranger Than Fiction, to name a mere handful.  The titles of these clearly suggest the cinematic subject and I urge you to take a look at these in full on the GFF site.

The Glasgow Music and Film Festival live events we have already nudged you encouragingly towards, and the announcement of the full GFF programme brings some great additions.  The strand will feature screenings of Swedish radical musical Sound of Noise; Danny O’Connor’s documentary of the rise and fall of “the UK’s most inspired and dissolute label” – Upside Down: The Creation Records Story; Céline Danhier’s Blank City – a suitable visual accompaniment for the No Wave enthusiast, it being a documentary charting No Wave Cinema and The Cinema of Transgression in New York City circa 1977 to 1987 (though it should be noted that this is not heavy on music content).

The world premiere of You Instead will take place on Friday 25 February, a romantic comedy from David Makenzie which was filmed in a revolutionary style over a mere five days – in real time – at T in the Park 2010. You Instead is included in the Great Scots category but I thought it would be worth a mention.  I might be a raging audiophile and cinema snob but at heart I love a good rom-com and recently was referred to by Phil as ‘elba’s dodgy pop music aficionado.’ So be it!

Another premiere that the festival has under its likely straining belt, as part of the delicious and disquieting FrightFest, is Hobo With a Shotgun.  The film features Rutger Hauer as the title lead, a vigilante homeless man dealing out vengance. Filmmaker Jason Eisener won SXSW’s Grindhouse competition with his original fake trailer and now presents a full length production.

The final part I wish to touch on, as the nerd in me just cannot let this post pass without mentioning it, is the Mark Millar curated ‘Superheroes in Glasgow’ section.  As well as a number of appropriate cult superhero films writer Mark Miller will present, alongside other special guests, a series of ‘access the industry’ events.  From workshops to a discussion with Dave Gibbons, this is looking like a fascinating delve into the world of graphic novels.

The full brochure can be viewed online, picked up at the GFT (and the usual haunts in Glasgow) or can even be sent directly to your door! There are further GFF announcements to be made in the build up to the Opening Gala so be sure to subscribe to the newsletter if you do request a brochure.

Glasgow Film Festival 2011 – Music & Film

Happy New Year to you all.  We have not really departed over the festive period so, rather than catch you up on the few days where we managed to shut up(!), let’s instead charge on with this brand spanking new year and all that it has to offer.

What better way to do this than to give you details of the Glasgow Music & Film Festival 2011, which is returning for this its third year in February.  Co-curated by film buffs and music geeks from Glasgow Film Festival and the Arches, a series of one off events combining audio and visuals  are presented for your immersion.  The line up is looking intense with Goblin, Zombie Zombie, 65daysofstatic, Davie Scott, Duglas T Stewart, Lucky Dragons and many more being selected to interpret, rework and pay homage to films such as The Wicker Man, Battleship Potemkin and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Alongside the live programme of music a series of documentaries will feature as part of the festival. Details of these will be announced along with the full Glasgow Film Festival line-up on 19 January 2011.

Giddy yet?  The Zombie Zombie Battleship Potemkin event as well as the 65daysofstatic soundscape for Douglas Trumbull’s science fiction classic Silent Running look unmissable. Goblin, masters of horror scoring (think Argento and Dawn of the Dead), will mess with your equilibrium to no end. These alone would be enough to please even the most discerning film and music connoisseur and yet the programme continues to tease with pieces of Morricone and more.

65DAYSOFSTATIC, The Arches, Sat 19 & Sun 20 February, 7.30pm, £10

Gary Lucas, Monday 21 February, O2 ABC, Mon 21 February, 8pm, £15

NYOS Futures: Vanishing Boundaries, The Arches, Mon 21, 8pm, £9/£6

Lucky Dragons: No Boundaries, No Hierarchies, The Arches: Tues 22, 7.30pm, £7

Zombie Zombie: Battleship Potemkin, The Arches, 23 Feb, 7.30pm, £10

The Memory Band: The Wicker Man, The Arches, Thurs 24 Feb. 7.30pm, £6

Goblin, The Arches, Friday 25, 7pm, £24

David Scott, Duglas T Stewart & Friends: Mondo Morricone, The Arches, Sat 26, 7.30pm, £15

All shows listed are on sale now and can be purchased via the GFT Box Office (0141 332 6535), The Arches Box Office (0141 565 1000) or for the Gary Lucas show from the O2 Academy Box Office (0844 477 2000).