Tagged: eagleowl

Elba Annual 2013 – Gerry Loves Records

downloadThe third installment in this year’s Elba Annual comes courtesy of Andy from Gerry Loves Records. Gerry Loves seem to have the knack of taking money from muso’s by continually releasing good music and nice looking products, and have in the last year have put out EP’s and singles from Adam Stafford, Over the Wall, John Knox Sex Club and our personal favourite, Book Group.

This is also now the second annual post in a row whereby the interviewee has chosen an absolute doozler of a track of the year that I hadn’t heard before. We also got a fairly extensive ‘Albums of the year’ list.

Enjoy y’all.

Album of the year

There’s no way I could pick one. Here’s my top 10 in no particular order:

Indians – Somewhere Else
Hookworms – Pearl Mystic
Swearin’ – Surfing Strange
Waxahatchee – Cerulean Salt
Jon Hopkins – Immunity
Julianna Barwick – The Magic Place
Golden Grrrls – Golden Grrrls
Youth Lagoon – Wondrous Bughouse
Low – The Invisible Way
The Pastels – Slow Summits

I also loved records by people I know, so I left them out of the above:

Adam Stafford – Invisible Walls Collapse
Rick Redbeard – No Selfish Heart
Conquering Animal Sound
eagleowl – this silent year
RM Hubbert – Breaks and Bone
The Yawns – The Yawns
Burnt Ones – You’ll Never Walk Alone

Song of the year

Courtney Barnett – “Avant Gardener”

I’m obsessed.

Best gig you put on

Best gig we put on was John Knox Sex Club + Over the Wall + Book Group at Stereo in October. By far the biggest show we’ve ever done and the reaction was incredible. All the bands were on top form too.

Phillip PAWS trying to remember the words to Taylor Swift at his solo show in Edinburgh was also a highlight for me.

Best gig you saw

My memory is terrible and unlike records I don’t have gigs lying around to remind me. So I’ll go with Indians in a church in Austin, TX in March at SXSW. I’d been in love with their (his) record since it came out. We ended up seeing them twice that day. The first time was in the car park of a shop in north Austin in the sweltering afternoon heat, and they were great then too. But that evening in the Presbyterian Church was amazing. The building and hushed atmosphere really worked with the music. Big and echoey and solemn but not downbeat. They only played for about half an hour too, which just made me want more.

Any musical thoughts to share on the year 2013?

It’s been a really good year, I think. Lots of good, odd electronic stuff came out this year. Lots of big bands came out with new albums that for some reason I wasn’t that interested in: Kanye, The National, Nick Cave, Arcade Fire and more.

I wish people would try and remember what they were like at 20, and what that would have been twisted to look like if they were in the public eye.

There seems to have been less good mainstream pop this year (Roar and some Dev Hynes stuff being the exceptions).

What does 2014 have in store for you?

We’ve got a few releases in the pipeline, including an album, but who knows. If our previous experience is anything to go by though, some of that won’t happen and some new things will come along. We’ve also got some shows planned further afield. Nothing we can confirm yet though!

Fill a loved ones stocking over at the Gerry Loves online store!

Today's Pick In Edinburgh – 4/8/13

Where we pick one or maybe several things to check out in Edinburgh during the month of August [disclaimer: in the event of tardiness or over-eagerness, don’t be fooled by the headline, it’s today cos we’re picking it today, rather than you should go today]

edinburgh nightAfter a bit of art and comedy we’re back in more familiar waters with today’s pick, which is the excellent looking Edinburgh Night, put on by music industry brain-boxes, Born To Be Wide.

Taking place at Electric Circus, the night has an interesting format with several bands and a plethora of guest DJ’s. The night follows an interesting format of 10 minute live sets every half hour, punctuated by DJ sets from some well-known faces from the local music scene, including Elba pals Nicola Meighan (The List/The Herald) and Lloyd Meredith (Olive Grove Records). The musical line-up ain’t too shabby either with sets from Randolph’s Leap, Gastric Band, past Elba podcastee A.J. Roach and Scotland’s only and probably best Grandaddy tribute band, Grand Laddie (Bart Eagleowl and friends) and several more.

However, possibly the great thing about the gig, well, after the excellent music, is the fact that you can buy a ticket here, right now, for only £3! Even better than that though, is that if you visit their Facebook event page, share it and then post your top 4 Edinburgh tracks on their event page wall, they’ll let you in free. Can’t sniff at that on a Sunday night on the first weekend of the festival!

The Pale Imitation Festival

If it wasn’t enough that we’d provided you with some decent looking festivals to check out this summer and that we weren’t already creating a list of the best jugglers, statues and street magicians for you to go and hurl coppers at in Edinburgh this August, then we’re completely spoiling you by telling you about The Pale Imitation Festival, also taking place in Edinburgh between the 1st and 31st of August.

Pale_Imitation_Digiflyer

Click above image to enlarge/see more clearly

The phrase ‘stellar line-up’ doesn’t even come close to describing the excellent bit of programming put together by Back Garden Promotions (or Matthew from Song, By Toad, Bart from Eagleowl, Neil from Meursault and Rob St.John). The festival will take place on selected dates throughout the month of August at Henry’s Cellar Bar and all the gigs cost a fiver to get in apart from the Malcolm Middleton, Ian Humberstone and Now Wakes The Sea gig, which is £7. Alternatively, you could just buy a season ticket for £25 and be done with it. I mean, you’ll struggle to find anything better to do in August.

Normally, I’d list a couple of the standouts in the line-up but I’d feel bad, because I’d be omitting so much* so it’s probably best that you get the run down from Song, By Toad who published this handy guide to each artist over on his blog.

Season and individual tickets can be bought over here.

* we totally think you should go and see Jonnie Common, FOUND, Plastic Animals, Deathcats, Siobhan Wilson, Sparrow & The Workshop, RM Hubbert, The Leg, Malcolm Middleton, Now Wakes The Sea, Rob St.John and Eagleowl though…

Field Music (the venue, not the band)

Please note that I love Field Music (the band) but today I choose to talk about the sport of enjoying music out on a vast grassy space. Here there would be a lovely photo of some grass but apparently uploading images is threatening to overheat my crank-powered macbook. Hi ho.

The summer months prompt sensory nostalgia for me. There is a late evening sun, which at the right point has a glow that will ever remind me of a day running about amidst a war with water. I was quite the trooper at seven years of age. Armed with my fifty pence squirt gun, I took out an array of enemies from Aunt, to Nana, to Sister in the rose-edged quadrangle of battlefield to be conquered. Alas, my hopes plunged from vast heights that day, like the full pot of cold water that my cousin dunked over my head with her foot of advantage. I felt such a sun-induced headiness of heroism, which was quickly replaced with the sobering chill of being soaked to the bone; a fitting parallel to the fading haze of a cooling summer night.

Over the last week the temperature has fluctuated and the threatening clouds linger to punctuate the ‘Scottish summer’ . This transports me elsewhere, into not a single memory but an amassed and inseparable collection of experience. There is a smell from drying disturbed grass that appears in, yet feels so displaced within, the city. It is that of fresh and still air that I associate with the first draw of breath in the waking hours of a festival. That cleansing inhalation provides resuscitation after the Antipodean experience of an overheated or frozen night in a tent (there is rarely ground between these opposing extremes), whilst your body retaliates against your mild poisoning of it with copious amounts of… whatever. This is the scent and taste of being ready to start anew.

Scotland’s festivals are providing grounds that could be the potential for either of the above summers. If, like the man at the helm of Elba, you have a child or, like myself, you are still mentally a child there are festivals such as The Kelburn Garden Party that promise fine music, food, drink and adventures that cater to a generous age range. Their musical agenda is to the left but they have opted for fun and friendly. The line up shouts summer party – you know that back garden barbecue kind – with Mr Scruff and Trojan Soundsystem headlining their Viewpoint stage. They have a roster of funk, reggae, electro and plonky guitars that would have me basking delightfully with a craft ale of local origin in hand. As for the family friendly element, Kelburn boasts adventure assault courses, a falconry and secret woodland trails. The premiering event is set within the reachable location of Kelburn Castle, near Largs on the 6th and 7th of July.

The Insider returns to Inshriach House in Aviemore this weekend, kicking off on the 21st of June with a line up that I want to cuddle. I do. I just want to grab ahold of it and snuggle right in. Excuse the list-mania that’s about to follow but it’s the most simple way to announce my joy and not spend hours proclaiming the talent and value of the artists involved. With a deep breath and great honour, I would like to rattle off the following: Washington Irving, Sparrow and the Workshop, Matthew Herbert, Miaoux Miaoux, Randolph’s Leap, Karine Polwart, Paws, Super Adventure Club, Stealing Sheep, Blood Relatives. That’s barely the bulk! It’s a line up that is evocative of an alternative and folk craft and will call to a sub-sect of listener. There’s a good balance of softness and punch across the weekend. Then there’s the food. Oh, the food. More listing(!): The Painting School, Harajuku Kitchen, Wild Rover Food, Artisan Roast, SMOAK, Woodburns Pizza, Inshriach Cake Shop and The Travelling Tearoom. Go and peruse the site for more details on the artists and food and no doubt you’ll be booking a last minute ticket.

Doune The Rabbit Hole has absolutely no filler. In my eyes, it is the leanest festival there is. It is the Venison of festivals. Clinic and The Pastels, whose new album Slow Summits is tickling the inner ears of we at Elba, sell this weekend at Cardross Estate alone. With a billing that boasts, for instance, Alasdair Roberts, Meursault and Rozi Plain on top of this, I find myself willing to follow any rabbit ‘Doune’ any hole for such listening privilege providing its timekeeping is adequate. If you can’t make it along to that on the 22nd to 25th August there is a nifty little tour a(rabbits)foot. Doune presents The Music Tapes featuring Julian Koster of Neutral Milk Hotel on four stops with some varied support slots. It commences on the 22nd at Nice ‘N’ Sleazy with Eagleowl’s lo-fi providing warm up.

*

We are spoiled in Scotland. The above, I would hope, will go some ways to helping you to remember that we are surrounded by nature, by our preserved historical grounds, by our ceaseless and unrelenting talent and by excellent product that is all within arm’s reach. I find myself reflecting on it every time it stops raining.

 

*In your face laptop: I can still link to photos!

Rob St. John & Ian Humberstone – Your Phantom Limb/House on the Hill

I sometimes find myself sceptical of a split single or EP. I find that on many occasions the bands don’t particularly compliment one another or they are completely different styles or just plainly that I like one band and not the other, probably with no real reason.

However, with the above release, I most definitely like the whole release. I’m familiar with Rob St.John by name and not a huge amount of his music and I’m not familiar with Ian Humberstone at all, although I get the feeling that shouldn’t be the case and it’s probably completely through fault of my own. There is a cohesion to the 7″ which kind of tallies up when I read the accompanying press release to find that the pair have collaborated together in the past and

that both tracks were recorded in Humberstone’s kitchen on a Tascam reel to reel.

There’s something about Ian Humberstone’s voice which reminds me a bit of Bill Callahan but I’m not really one for making observations and comparisons so we’ll leave it at that. It is a subtle and gently crafted release, both songs different but very much alike. It meanders along beautifully and if truth be told, I get a bit disappointed when we reach the end, although, I can always go back to the start and listen again.

The 7″ is available now from Song, By Toad records and various other outlets. You can peruse and make your purchase here.

‘Your Phantom Limb’ is the first single from Rob St John’s album which is due for release on Song, By Toad Records in November. He takes off to London, Oxford and lands back in Edinburgh for a couple of release shows. We’d like to point out here that if you are in London, he’s playing with the fantastic Birdengine, so it should be quite a gig. Full dates are below;

14th Oct London – King’s Place with Viking Moses and Birdengine
15th Oct Oxford – Modern Art Oxford with Viking Moses and Petrels
22nd Oct Edinburgh – Pilrig St. Paul’s with Meursault, eagleowl & Viking Moses

Rob St. John & Ian Humberstone Split 7″ by Song, by Toad